Draft Classifications during the Vietnam War

Draft Board Classifications
The following is a list of Selective Service classifications
that could be assigned by draft boards:

I-A
Available for military service

I-A-0
Conscientious objector available for noncombatant military service only

I-C
Member of the armed forces of the U.S., the Coast and Geodetic Survey, or the Public Health Service

I-D
Member of reserve component or student taking military training

I-H
Registrant not currently subject to processing for induction

I-0
Conscientious objector available for civilian work contributing to the maintenance of the national health, safety, or interest

I-S
Student deferred by statute (High School)

I-Y
Registrant available for military service, but qualified for military only in the event of war or national emergency

I-W
Conscientious objector performing civilian work
contributing to the maintenance of the national health, safety, or interest

II-A
Registrant deferred because of civilian occupation (except agriculture or activity in study)

II-C
Registrant deferred because of agricultural occupation

II-D
Registrant deferred because of study preparing for the ministry

II-S
Registrant deferred because of activity in study

III-A
Registrant with a child or children; registrant deferred by reason of extreme hardship to dependents

IV-A
Registrant who has completed service; sole surviving son

IV-B
Official deferred by law

IV-C
Alien

IV-D
Minister of religion or divinity student

IV-F
Registrant not qualified for any military service

IV-G
Registrant exempt from service during peace (surviving son or brother)

IV-W
Conscientious objector who has completed alternate service contributing to the maintenance of the national health, safety, or interest in lieu of induction into the Armed Forces of the United States

V-A
Registrant over the age of liability for military service
…a further note from an email in May 2002:
“I noticed that my draft classification was not listed on your site’s list of draft board classification – 1SC. It meant that you had exactly six months to get your affairs in order before you would be drafted.
I was 2S until February 1966 when I received my draft notice to report for induction. After talking with my draft board they let me finish my school semester then drafted me. During that period I was issued a draft card with the 1SC designation.
In July of 1966 I was drafted into the US Army. Regards, Tom Olsen, Pvt, USCDCEC, 1966-1968″

Our appreciation goes out to the “Beachmaster” for sending additional codes for our original list from his copy of ‘SSS Form 110′ dated August 11, 1972.  See his additions above under classifications: 1H, 2D, 4G, and 4W.


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